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Gay Marriage Ban Like Interracial Marriage Ban

One Mom's view that 'Keep government out of our lives' proponents often favor personal meddling.

I have been thinking a lot about marriage this week. Of course, it may have had a lot to do with the research necessary for topics.

I am not gay, so the court’s decision on the legality of Prop. 8 supporters' case will not have a direct effect on my life. But it’s comical to watch the “conservative” politicians campaign against same-sex marriage while they profess their disdain for government intruding on the lives of American citizens. Reminds me of the angry protesters jabbing their placards into the air: “Keep your government hands off my Medicare.”

By the same token, they want to teach kids “no sex before marriage” rather than clinical information about their sexual health. Why is the government telling anyone when and whom they can have sex with?

Confusion sets in, and it becomes a full-time job to sort it out for my kids. Yes, they are smart enough to know that these are conflicting ideas.

Then I am forced to watch as my daughter takes notes on the Republican debate for her homework assignment. And there is not one bottle of wine in the house. So there is no wineglass in hand to throw at the television as we are told that the free market will solve our

Unless, of course, you are gay, then you can’t get married so you can’t always be covered by your partner’s free-market insurance policy. Now the free market gets to dictate whom you get to share your life with.

Our society has created a set of benefits for married people. At the same time, we decided that only a certain part of our society can be allowed these benefits. These restrictions have evolved throughout our history. One might remember that interracial marriages used to be against the law here in California.

This was successfully challenged by Perez v. Sharp in 1948.  “The court held that marriage is a fundamental right and that laws restricting that right must not be based solely on prejudice. The majority opinion by Justice Roger Traynor and joined by Chief Justice Phil Gibson and Justice Jesse Carter, held that restrictions due to discrimination violated the constitutional requirements of due process and equal protection of the laws."

We might better serve our society by not letting personal beliefs dictate the individual choices of others.

 

 

 

Panglonymous September 17, 2011 at 04:35 AM
Just stepped off the way back machine. You're a good person, Ms. Wride. BS The Patch is lucky to have you.
Nancy Wride September 17, 2011 at 07:24 PM
Why thank you, Pan. What's the way back machine? (my Morris Kight profile in days of yore)?
Shore Resident September 17, 2011 at 08:12 PM
Nancy, the wayback machine is from a segment in the Rocky and Bullwinkle Show where Mr. Peabody (a dog) and his boy Sherman would go back in time and relive (and most often alter) history. I think I'm showing my age, but R&B is still one of my favorite cartoons.
Panglonymous September 18, 2011 at 05:41 PM
Yeah, Nancy, your piece and the wonderful NEH-funded historical resources the LGBT community provides so generously online. (Then there're those mischievous archivists up SF way sponging up everything everyone says and does web-wise: http://www.archive.org/web/web.php ) Shore, I still have the theme to that show run through what's left of my mind occasionally. Always brings a smile... http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z5YSgPZ-OK4
Nancy Wride September 18, 2011 at 06:15 PM
The Way Back Machine has its own blog.....I love that. My husband and son watch Rocky & Bullwinkle together along with old Get Smart reruns. (I think I worked for Agent 99 in a newsroom once).

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